The Evolution of Dance

by Lauren Khalaf
06.20.2011


Throughout the years we’ve heard of some pretty ridiculous dance move names and seen some even crazier moves displayed in the club. We’ve decided to take you through the dance moves from the '50s to today. From the The Stroll to the Fist Pump, dance has transformed into movements no one could have predicted.

Like fashion, these moves go in and out of style. Join us while we journey along the evolution of dance.


Dance moves of the '50s: The Stroll & The Hand Jive

The Stroll:
One of the most trendy dances of the '50’s and customarily noticed in movies from this era. This dance is frequently performed by a female, yet males often joined in. To perform there must be two lines of dancers, lead dancers on one side and their partners on the other. There should be a large space down the middle of the two lines. The leaders perform a solo routine while their partners do a step pattern. Both sides meet at the end of the line.

The Hand Jive: An alternative admired dance move from the '50s. Does the name sound recognizable? You can find this dance move on the admired movie, Grease. There’s not a lot of technique involved, so anyone can do this move. Simply move your arms and hands in a pattern and you’ve got the Hand Jive down.

Rock 'n' Roll came along at the end of the '50s and changed the ideal way of dance. Partners were no longer a prerequisite and individuals danced to the beat of the music alone.





Dance moves of the '60s: The Twist & The Mashed Potato

The Twist:
This was the first international dance style that didn’t involve dance partners to touch. According to Chubby Checker, singer-songwriter of “The Twist,” the technique resembles the gesture of “putting out a cigarette with both feet, and wiping your bottom with a towel, to the beat of the music.” Cigarettes and wiping your “bottom?" Nice description.

The Mashed Potato: This dance begins with stepping backward with one foot while your heel is tilted inward. This foot should be positioned behind your other foot. With your weight focused on your starting foot and swivel your heel outward. And follow the steps with your other foot.







Dance moves of the '70s: The Hustle & The Bump

The Hustle:
If you haven’t heard of this, then you’re probably too young to be reading this. The Hustle is the most famed and widely known dance move of the '70s. To perform this move, dancers will have to line up with one another and as soon as the music starts you step backward four times and then step forward four times. Then, you move to the right four times followed by four moves to the left. While standing in your position, you now display four classic disco moves for eight beats. Next, you roll your fists two counts followed by the funky chicken for two counts. To end the The Hustle, step forward one beat, step backward one beat, sideways one beat and do a quarter turn to your left.
Yes, this is the most extensive move so far. You’ll almost certainly have to practice this one a few times, preferably alone when no one is around.

The Bump: This is a two-step dance. We’re attempting to get you to forget about the difficulty of the preceding dance. All you have to do is take one beat to bump hips, and one beat to sway your hips. You can do whichever kind of bump your heart desires, back to front bump or even side to fronts bump.



Dance moves of the '80s: The Break Dance & The Cabbage Patch

The Break Dance:
There is a range of moves in break dancing, however we’re going to focus on The Worm. Lie flat on the ground and using your toes pick up your feet, legs and hips in a worm motion. Lift your body as your feet and legs go back down to the floor. Then, fall back down into a flat position on the floor.

The Cabbage Patch: It is beyond us why anyone would name a dance after the hideous dolls of the past, but then again nothing seizes to amaze us. To perform The Cabbage Patch there are five simple steps. To begin, isolate your ribs, and shift them to the left. Circle your torso to the right and go all the way around. Put your arms out in front of you, makes fists with both of your hands and then circle your arms around in front of you. Don’t hesitate to get your shoulders involved. To finish off the dance, circle your entire body while turning your ribs and arms.



Dance moves of the '90s: The Tootsie Roll & The Electric Slide

The Tootsie Roll:
Dance the Tootsie Roll by twisting both your legs inward and outward with your knees in a bent position. Essentially, you’re making a butterfly motion with your legs.

The Electric Slide: This is always a hit at parties. Everyone gets involved and if you don’t know the dance you literally just follow the steps of the song “Electric Boogie” by Marcia Griffiths.




Dance moves of the 2000s to today: The Booty-Dance & The Fist Pump

The Booty-Dance:
To be blunt, this dance move resembles dry humping. You bend your knees, crouch over and shake your booty in and out in a thrusting motion.

The Fist Pump: As if the "Jersey Shore" hasn’t gotten enough publicity from their GTL routine, they created a worldwide dance move, which only requires you to pump your fist. Yes, the name of the dance is in fact self-explanatory. Get ready; this may be the most difficult move yet. Raise your arm, make a fist with your hand, start near your face and punch the air. You are now a professional fist pumper.

We trust you’ve gotten a respectable idea of dances from the past compared to the dance moves of today. Not if, but when these dance moves make their way back into our nightlife regime you’ll be the first to blast out onto the dance floor with skills from the past.
follow Clubplanet @  
More About Nightlife
Click here for RSS feed
Above & Beyond Announce New Album for 2018
p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; line-height: 15.0px; font: 12.0px Helvetica}p.p2 {margin:...
The ClubPlanet Interview: Sir Ivan
Sir Ivan is a musical superhero.  Dressed in a bejeweled cape; his mission is to...
Music for the Masses
A roundup of great house, electro, progressive, pop and vocal dance tracks. Wolfgang...
Music for the Masses
A roundup of great house, electro, progressive, hardstyle and vocal dance tracks. GoodLuck -...
SUNDAY FUNDAY:  True2Life ft Lady Bunny - (For You) I’ll Wait
Sunday Funday:  True2Life ft Lady Bunny - (For You) I’ll Wait - [UNIQUE2RHYTHM] The...
SUNDAY FUNDAY:  Steven Redant & Peyton - Let It Shine
SUNDAY FUNDAY:  Steven Redant & Peyton - Let It Shine - [SWISHCRAFT] “Let it Shine”...
Music for the Masses: Miami Music Edition
Special Miami edition - the best new music we heard on South Beach during Miami Music Week and...
SUNDAY FUNDAY: Afro Bros ft Ghetto Flow - 18+
SUNDAY FUNDAY:   Afro Bros ft Ghetto Flow - 18+ - [SPINNIN] People throw a lot of...
Tags

Log in here to submit a tag

CP Buzz on facebook

Music for the Masses
A roundup of great house, electro, progressive, pop and vocal dance tracks. Wolfgang...
Music for the Masses
A roundup of great house, electro, progressive, hardstyle and vocal dance tracks. GoodLuck -...
SUNDAY FUNDAY:  True2Life ft Lady Bunny - (For You) I’ll Wait
Sunday Funday:  True2Life ft Lady Bunny - (For You) I’ll Wait - [UNIQUE2RHYTHM] The...
SUNDAY FUNDAY:  Steven Redant & Peyton - Let It Shine
SUNDAY FUNDAY:  Steven Redant & Peyton - Let It Shine - [SWISHCRAFT] “Let it Shine”...
Music for the Masses: Miami Music Edition
Special Miami edition - the best new music we heard on South Beach during Miami Music Week and...
Above & Beyond Announce New Album for 2018
p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; line-height: 15.0px; font: 12.0px Helvetica}p.p2 {margin:...
The ClubPlanet Interview: Sir Ivan
Sir Ivan is a musical superhero.  Dressed in a bejeweled cape; his mission is to...
The ClubPlanet Interview: Dave Winnel
Doing interviews is a challenge for DJs.  They are often stuck in a room answering the same...
The ClubPlanet Interview: Junior J
Spinnin is the breeding ground for the next generation of DJ talent.   Martin Garrix,...
The ClubPlanet Interview: Rodg
Armin van Buuren called Rodg “one of the best producers of 2016” and when you listen to his album...