The Colin C Interview

by Adam Singer
12.01.2006

He's Colin Cameron Allrich, also known as Slighter, also known as Deeptone, (and Consoul and The Pushers), but he's known to most as simply Colin C. He has a passion for electronic music, and clearly the gift to drive it. Colin is a rising star in the EDM world, having had his music played by artists globally, and having shared the stage with many of dance music’s biggest DJs.

Having an extensive background in music production, Colin has contributed to different solo and collaborative projects for nearly ten years, and was a member of the band Bad Morning After. It was here that his passion was sparked in electronic instruments and synthesis. Since then Colin has created a collection of Progressive House/Breaks, under the monikers of Deeptone, Slighter, The Pushers, and most recently Consoul.

I caught up with Colin to get a bit more insight into the world of an up-and-coming artist in the modern EDM world.

Adam Singer: Being a successful up-and-coming artist in Los Angeles obviously takes much work, dedication and desire. Can you tell us what inspires you to continuously push your craft?

Colin C: I don’t really feel like I’m that successful, to me it’s an ever growing battle to be comfortable with my work and push myself forward by constant re-evaluation. I think that’s the part of being an artist that helps and hinders you at the same time. As for inspiration, I don’t let an aspect of my life NOT influence my work, shitty days tend to transform into my work as easily as does hearing how others are changing things up, or discovering something new about a piece of gear.

Tell us a little bit about your studio setup. I know you recently have begun to embrace hardware – how is that experience compared to a pure software setup?

Yea I really started writing my own music when the idea of getting every sound out of the computer was still young, mainly due to the fact that I couldn’t afford more than my shitty PC and Jeskola’s Buzz tracker… and it’s kind of been my credo to keep it software ever since. I feel like this way you can really keep a DIY mentality yet try new things that would have required quite and investment if it were hardware. Recently I’ve been able to get my studio to a comfortable place with the help of the Virus Ti. I’m a Logic nut, and the integration into my Logic rig made it really speak to me, but other than that I’m sticking to software.

You’re actively involved with progressivehouse.com and work to give artists on the site feedback, help them gain exposure and get signed to labels. It’s admirable you do so much to help up-and-coming artists – can you tell us a few ‘unknowns’ you’re exited about you found through the site?

Yeah www.progressivehouse.com is where I really started to grow inside the electronic community, and I feel that I owe it to Mike (the owner of the site) and myself to get in there and help people out with production questions when I can and hear how people are discovering the scene and getting into production. There’s a lot of talent brewing on there, Ali (Erphun) has launched himself from that site and is now on CP Recordings, SAW and our own Red Circle (www.redcirclemusic.com). T-Lectual and Matt Haze are among my favorites who are really starting to show some promise. Electronic music has always been a community in my mind, so I feel I should help keep it that way and try and help out when I can.

Your productions are revered in the underground-electronic scene, having been given the nod by DJs like Hernan Cattaneo, Anthony Pappa and Greg Benz. You’ve got tracks signed to major and indie labels. You’ve traveled across the US for gigs and have played alongside plenty of big name DJs, from Paul Oakenfold to Habersham. You’ve had your music top the Beatport download list. Clearly you’re an accomplished artist – can you tell us what’s next for your career?

Colin-C-2.jpg

Accomplished isn’t the word that springs to mind . I really feel like there’s so much more I want to do, I hate pigeonholing myself into one idea or sound. I just want to create work that people will build some memories on and not just become disposable, that’s really what’s fueling my album project. I’ve stepped back into what I was trying to get across with my early solo work, but now with the skills and foresight to pull it off. I guess I’m not trying to think of it as a career but more as a journey that every artist inevitably goes through. I’m not necessarily thinking about what’s going to build or break my career, I’m just doing what I do and hoping some people will get it and be able to enjoy it.

Tell us your thoughts on the current state of the electronic music scene – specifically what can artists, promoters and listeners do to make things better?

I think we are at a turning point with what’s going on now, I really feel that electronic music has more room to grow if people will let it, and it just feels like people are still trying to cling on to certain ideals. I really don’t think that the scene is suffering in the creative department, but then again I don’t find myself following the trends. I think if there’s anything we all can do is to remember why we got into this music in the first place, and figure out a way to keep that spark alive. There’s always been a side to electronic music that’s been glossed over for mass consumption and that will always be present, its part of every music genre… it’s up to us to keep at it in spite of that. I kind of hope this ‘electro’ craze is the last hurrah though… they say the past is doomed to repeat itself, well that’s only if we sit back and let it.

You’re part of the ‘next generation’ of electronic musicians. Do you think the new generation is going to bring a much-needed renaissance to our culture?

It will be interesting to see what happens now that we have ways for kids to get into production very cheaply, I think right now its really the weeding out period where we have so many new digital “labels” popping up and any kid with Reason can have tracks out and think that it’s going to get them up there with Tiesto. Once the glamorized fascination dies down, people who are really in love with production and the craft will eventually rise to the top and help push this all forward.

Mac or PC?

Mac all the way! I seriously got to the point with my PC that I had to toss it. It’s not intuitive to my way of thinking, where in Logic on my Power Mac I can sit down and get the software to bend to my mood and not feel like it’s telling me what to do. I admire the people who have the patience to stick it out with PC, but I tend to like things not to crash or have me re-install the OS every two months.

Advice for future producers or DJs?

Experiment, that’s my best advice. People always ask me when I train them at my job in Logic or sound design how I know everything I know… and honestly it’s all due to experimenting. I never went to school for production, never took a theory class in my life, but I did spend the last 10 years of my life glued to my computer and glued to my stereo listening to how others were experimenting and tried to find my own ways of pushing sound the way they did.

 

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